One night I awoke from a deep sleep with the following message in my head “There is a candy bar on the bottom shelf behind the catsup!” Something long forgotten, no longer visible was still lodged inside my brain. Have you ever spent hours pouring over old genealogy records and not found any real answers? Then, suddenly an idea pops into the head about where to search next? I believe there is a real light in there! It is so bright that it washes all the convoluted thoughts and presents instead uniquely obvious ideas. The neuropathic path upon which this…


Boarding a vessel

As genealogists, we quickly gather names, dates and places. But do we really understand the personal struggles of our ancestors during their presence upon the earth? For one, past generations were swamped with problems of immigration and the voyage to America. They all came for various reasons. Learning these reasons is an excellent beginning for the genealogist as it provides some interesting clues. Do we not ever-watch and observe our contemporaries to learn their route to wealth and happiness? How much more rewarding is it, then, when we learn of the history and struggles of our very own families? Sometimes…


Space-X

Come on over to GeorgiaPioneers.com You will be surprised how many old records this site contains. Here is a link to the holdings of each county. Click on the desired county.

https://georgiapioneers.com/counties/gacountiesidx.html


Genealogy Tips by Jeannette Holland Austin

The tax digests in any given county in the State of Georgia provides essential data to the researcher as it lists all of the parcels of land which the person owned and in what counties. In Georgia, one can easily define the acquisition of properties from lotteries and the approximate date simply by noting the amount of acreage in the tax record. For example, the 1805 and 1807 land lotteries offered 202–1/2 acres in Baldwin and Wilkinson Counties; and 490 acres in Wayne County (1805). During 1820: Appling (490), Early (250); Gwinnett (250); Habersham…


Washington Crossing the Delaware

How a Historical Past Reveals What Happens Today

You have doubtless heard the expression that “nothing is new under the sun?” Understanding today involves knowing yesterday. The modern age has suffered a re-writing of school history books. This is unfortunate, because the writers were not present at the events, nor alive. That means that the modern version of the past is “opinion” or “propaganda”. That leaves the task to us of teaching historical subjects to our children. But this easy for genealogists who researches every detail of the ancestor’s lifestyle and the surrounding events, such as immigration and wars. He reads pensions from the…


How Reliable are Memories of Things Past?

The genealogist know all about memory, especially from interviewing relatives. Sometimes the memory of an event is actually better than the event itself. That is because as time passes and we have the privilege of embellishing upon it in a happier way it becomes more elusive. That is one of the reasons that people do not have perfect recall. Can you remember the date of your grandmother’s death? Or Mother? Since birth, we are processing family information into our memory banks, yet recalling it seems to fade into oblivion. We are more accurate in our recall effort shortly after the…


Log Cabins

The first settlers to Loudoun County were a rough and sturdy folk, those first poorer arrivals were illiterate for the most part. Their poor living conditions from birth provided self-reliance in meeting the problems of existence on a sparsely settled land and wholly ignorant of the relative comforts of life enjoyed by the prosperous planters in tidewater. They built rude cabins of logs in such places as seemed best to them, paying scant attention to land titles and being in fact, for the most part, mere squatters on their holdings; and there they planted small patches of corn and beans…


Historical Smithfield, Virginia

Pagan River

Pictured is the Pagan River near Jamestown. Smithfield was first colonized in 1634 and occupied an Indian site called Warascoyak, also spelled Warrosquoyacke, which was first a county of that name. It was renamed Isle of Wight County in 1637. The town itself was established as a seaport ca 1752 by Arthur Smith IV. An area called “Wharf Hill” was established as a waterfront for industries and served during the Revolutionary War as a harbor for patriots to receive arms and supplies. It was this dock which was used in the “Show Boat” a famous drama of…


Shenandoah Hunting Path

The first record of the “Susquehannock Plain Paths” was noted in the Virginia Act of 1662. Later, from about 1686 until 1742, that part of the road between Brent Town and the Rappahannock was also known as the “Shenandoah Hunting Path”, a nam which is still occasionally heard.


The fact that a number of English residents bequeathed certain properties to Virginians, suggests kinships and unfinished business in the Mother country. The very least that it does it to provide the genealogist with another source to research. The English wills should be examined with an eye to discovering relationships and compared with Virginia documents, such as wills, estates and deeds. Mrs. Margaret Cheeseman of Bermondsey left in her will ten pounds sterling to the children of Lemuel Mason of Lower Norfolk County in Virginia. John Pargiter of London bequeathed in 1687 ten pounds sterling to Sarah Lovell of Virginia…

Jeannette Austin

For 50 plus years I trace genealogies professionally, collect old wills, estates, wills, marriages, host georgiapioneers.com which includes AL GA KY NC SC TN VA

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